Contents

  1. Windows Questions
    1. How can I use Pexus X-Deep/32 on my own computer?
    2. I need some software by Microsoft for a project, can you give it to me?
    3. How do I take a screenshot in Windows?
    4. How do I enable X forwarding in Windows?
    5. How do I transfer files to or from the CIS systems?
    6. How do I burn an .ISO image to a Disc?
  2. Linux Questions
    1. How do I get started with Linux?
    2. I can't login to the Linux lab
    3. How do I remap keys in X?
    4. How do I install applications under Linux
    5. What are "Linux file permissions"?
      1. Ownership
      2. File Mode
      3. Viewing File Permissions
      4. Changing File Mode
      5. Absolute File mode
    6. What about the /tmp directory?
    7. How can I change the default app used to open files?
      1. Changing Default PDF Application
      2. Changing Other Default Applications
    8. How do I use CVS?
      1. Repository
      2. Commands
      3. Import
      4. Checkout
      5. Update
      6. Add
      7. Remove
      8. Commit
      9. Export
      10. Other Information
  3. Network Questions
    1. What network storage is available to me?
    2. How do I setup CGI on my web page?
    3. Why don't you have an FTP server?
    4. How do I backup data to CIS?
    5. How do I forward my CIS email somewhere else?
    6. How do I use HTTP authentication?
    7. Why am I getting 500 Interal Server Error on all my scripts?
    8. How do I setup ssh keys?
    9. How do I access the wireless network in Nichols?
    10. How do I access the wired network in Nichols?
    11. How do I access the campus VPN?
    12. How do I login remotely to CIS resources?
  4. Miscellaneous Questions
    1. How do I connect to Oracle?
      1. Connecting from Microsoft Windows
      2. Connecting from Linux
      3. Connecting from Java
      4. Connecting from the web
      5. General Connection Information
      6. How do I change my Oracle password?
    2. How do I connect to MySQL?
      1. Connecting from Linux
      2. Using phpMyAdmin
      3. How do I change my MySQL password?
      4. How do I reset my MySQL password?
      5. General Connection Information
    3. What happens when I leave? How long do I keep my account?
    4. Can you guys help me with my homework?
    5. What do I do when the printer is out of paper?
    6. How do I use VMWare in the Computing Labs
    7. How do I install JPF (Java PathFinder)?
      1. Initial Steps
      2. Running JPF
      3. For More Information
    8. How do I use PC^2 for the ACM Programming Contest?
      1. Web Client: EWTeam
      2. Local Client: pc2team
        1. Previously Installed Copy
        2. Installation
        3. Running
        4. Usage
    9. How do I use the Adobe Acrobat Connect Server?
      1. In-Depth How-To
      2. Creating Accounts
    10. I need some software by VMWare for a project, can you give it to me?
    11. How do I install IBM Rational Software Architect?
      1. Step 1: Suite Installation
      2. Step 2: License Installation
    12. When I run Visual Paradigm UML, I am asked to select a license
      1. Installing the license locally
      2. Workaround for Campus Firewall Blocking




Windows Questions

How can I use Pexus X-Deep/32 on my own computer?

First, you will need to go to the Pexus_ web site and download and install the current version of X-Deep/32. Install this according to their instructions. Since X-Deep/32 changed to freeware, you no longer need to request a license from the systems administrators to use this product. The CIS Systems Administration staff will be reviewing our official policy concerning the support of X-Deep/32 versus other X-Server applications for Windows.

I need some software by Microsoft for a project, can you give it to me?

Possibly. Our licensing with Microsoft allows us to give students software and licenses to install software on their own computers. Software may be obtained from the MSDN Academic Alliance Software Center. At the beginning of each semester, we update the online database with a list of all students currently enrolled in a CIS class. When we do this, you will receive an email from the DreamSpark Premium Webstore which contains a link that you will need to click to activate your account and set a password for it. Zimbra mail will sometimes flag this as spam, so if you don't see it in your Inbox, please check in your Spam/Junk folders to see if it is filtered there.

If your account is currently active or previously added but you never activated it, you will not receive an email. If you previously had an account that had been deactivated (accounts are deactivated automatically after one year from their creation), you will receive an email saying your account has been reactivated. If you don't remember your password in either of these cases, click on the "Forgot you password?" link on the site login page. Your username will always be <your_eid>@ksu.edu.

Once your account is confirmed, you can login to the webstore any time at the following URL:

http://e5.onthehub.com/WebStore/ProductsByMajorVersionList.aspx?ws=ee42c86a-bd9b-e011-969d-0030487d8897&vsro=8

You are free to download any software available on this site. You must use MS Internet Explorer to download software from E-Academy. Software available from E-Academy includes development tools and suites, operating systems, and some MS Office component applications, but not the Office suite or core applications such as Word, Excel, or Powerpoint. If you would like your own copy of the Office quite, you may purchase it from the Union Computer Store at a student discounted priced.

Remember, this is for you own personal use as a CIS student. You are not legally permitted to download software for your friends or families. Doing so will break the terms of the MSDNAA agreement. Distributing illegal copies of software is against state and federal laws and the policies of this university.

Your initial password is automatically generated when your account is added. You should change it as soon as possible by clicking on the "Your Account" link at the top of the page once you login.

How do I take a screenshot in Windows?

To take a screenshot (image of the screen) in Windows, follow the following steps:

  1. Press "Print Scrn" on the keyboard (next to "Scroll Lock" at the top).
  2. Open Microsoft Paint (Start Menu > All Programs > Accessories > Paint).

  3. Go to Edit > Paste to paste the image.

  4. Save the image as a BMP in your home directory by going to File > Save As...

  5. Do with the image as you please.

How do I enable X forwarding in Windows?

The following explains the process of enabling X forwarding through SSH to view X applications in Windows.

  1. Start XServer by going to Start > XServer

  2. Open PuTTY by going to Start > PuTTY

  3. In the Category menu for PuTTY, select Tunnels
  4. Check the box next to "Enable X11 Forwarding"
  5. In the Category menu for PuTTY, select Session
  6. Under Host Name, type "cislinux.cis.ksu.edu"
  7. Choose SSH as your Protocol
  8. Now click "Open"
  9. Enter your username and password when prompted
  10. Enjoy

You can test to see if X forwarding is working by typing "xeyes", which should bring up an application with two eyes following your mouse pointer.

How do I transfer files to or from the CIS systems?

NOTE: Due to authentication problems and account lockouts caused by WinSCP, we no longer recommend using this application for file transfer. We suggest the following instead.

FileZilla is a good cross-platform desktop file transfer application that is both free to use and open source. You can download the client from http://filezilla-project.org/ and install it on your own system.

When you launch FileZilla, the window looks like this: filezilla_main.png

First-time users will need to create a new connection which you can re-use later.

  1. Click on the the Site Manager button here:

    filezilla_sitemgr_button.png

  2. This opens up a new window. Click on the "New Site" button.

    filezilla_sitemgr1.png

  3. Set the name of your new site to something easy to remember, like the name of the server you are connecting to.

    filezilla_new_site.png

  4. Make the following changes to the site settings:
    • Protocol: SFTP - SSH File Transfer Protocol

    • Login Type: Ask for password

    • User: enter your username here, not your full email address

    And click OK when done.

    filezilla_sitemgr2.png

  5. You should now be returned to the main window. Click on the dropdown next to the Site Manager button and select your newly saved site.

    filezilla_host_selection.png

  6. You will be prompted for your password. Enter it here. NOTE: This is your CIS password, not your KSU eID password.

    filezilla_passwd_dialog.png

  7. Once connected, the main window should look like this. Transfer files by selecting the source on the left and destination on the right.

    filezilla_connected.png

  8. When you are finished, click on the Disconnect button.

    filezilla_disconnect.png

How do I burn an .ISO image to a Disc?

N022 and N126 labs have DeepBurner installed on the Windows machines along with CD/DVD burners. This is free software and is available to download for your own personal use at http://www.deepburner.com/.

To burn an .iso to CD/DVD, place a blank disc in the CD/DVD ROM tray and run DeepBurner. When the program starts, it will prompt you to select the project type. Select "Burn ISO image." Click the "..." button beside the Image file text box to specify the location of your saved .iso file. Click the "Burn ISO" button to begin burning the disc.




Linux Questions

How do I get started with Linux?

The basic commands you'll need are:

Command

Function

ls

list files

cd

change directory

mkdir

make directory

rmdir

remove directory

cp

copy

mv

move

nano

edit files (probably the easiest text-based editor on our systems)

man

user manuals

These are the most important commands. If you need more details on how to use them, you can type man cmd where "cmd" is the name of the command you want more information about.

I can't login to the Linux lab

Problem: When you try to login to a Linux lab desktop, the screen goes black and then reverts immediately to the login screen. No errors are displayed.

Cause: This is due to corruption or incompatibility of one of your X.org configuration files. The solution is to remove this file.

Resolution:

  1. Press <Ctrl>-<Alt>-<F1> to switch to a local virtual console and login using your regular credentials.

  2. At the prompt (ending with a $ character), type the following and press <Enter>

    • rm .Xauthority
  3. Logout using either logout or exit

  4. Switch back the the GUI login screen by pressing <Ctrl>-<Alt>-<F7>

You should now be able to login as usual.

How do I remap keys in X?

There are two ways to remap keys within X. The simplest method is to use the built in functionalities of your window manager if they exist. Gnome will allow a user to take care of tasks such as swapping control/caps through its Keyboard Preferences window. KDE has a Keyboard Layout section in its control center.

The other method is to use xmodmap. For this method you will need to create a ~/.xmodmap file to remap keys. Following is an example of one that would swap backspace/delete and control/caps. A ! character comments out the line.

   1 ! Swap delete and backspace
   2 keysym BackSpace = Delete
   3 keysym Delete = BackSpace
   4   
   5 ! Swap capslock and left control
   6 remove Lock = Caps_Lock
   7 remove Control = Control_L
   8 keysym Control_L = Caps_Lock
   9 keysym Caps_Lock = Control_L
  10 add Lock = Caps_Lock
  11 add Control = Control_L

You can this load this by running xmodmap ~/.xmodmap when you start your X session. There is not a good way to automate this every time Gnome starts since gnome-smproxy overwrites all keyboard settings. If anybody knows of a way, please let us know, and we can update this document to reflect that.

How do I install applications under Linux

Assuming that the application uses the standard autoconf and automake style of deployment, you should be able to install most applications into your home directory (or into another directory you have write access to, such as a /projects directory). To do so, you basically need to run the following inside the source package directory of the application:

   1 ./configure --prefix=/path/to/your/home/directory/local
   2 make
   3 make install

Make sure to set the path to something besides the root of your home directory (*not* like /home/grads/sterling) or you will have gobs of extra files in your home directory. Instead use a directory like local (e.g. /home/grads/sterling/local). If you have a /projects directory or other directory we've given you write permission to on the CIS filesystems, you may place your files there too.

What are "Linux file permissions"?

All student and faculty files in the CIS department are stored on a Linux file server. However, not everyone needs or should have access to every file. Linux file permissions are how the file server decides who can access which files and what kind of access is permitted.

Ownership

Every file in Linux is assigned an user owner and a group owner. These form the basis of file security.

Each group may contain zero or more users. In the CIS department, every user has a special group which contains only their user (e.g., if your username were foobar, your group would be foobar_users).

You may not change the user ownership of your files. If you find that some of your files are owned by the wrong user, you will need to contact the systems staff to get that problem correct.

You may, however, change the group ownership of your files (or directories). You are only able to change a file's group ownership to another group to which you belong. You may change group ownership with the chgrp program:

   1 chgrp foobar_users file.txt
   2 chgrp foobar_users dir

File Mode

The second component of Linux file ownership is called "file mode." The file mode determines what access the user owner, group owner, or other user has to a file.

There are three kinds of access: read, write, and execute. The access granted by each of these depends upon whether they are applied to a directory or to a file. For files, read access gives the user permission to see the contents of the file, write access gives the user permission to change the contents of the file, and execute access gives the user permission to run the file as a program. For directories, read access gives the user permission to see what files are stored in that directory, write access gives the user permission to create files in that directory, and execute access allows the user to enter that directory (note that directory execute is required for read or write to mean anything).

Viewing File Permissions

To view the permissions on a file or directory you can use the -l option to the file list command, ls::

   1 foobar@camaro projects$ ls -l
   2 total 4
   3 drwx------   3 foobar foobar_users 4096 Mar 16 19:51 bin/
   4 drwxrwxr-x   4 foobar foobar_users 4096 Mar 16 19:51 lib/
   5 -rw-r--r--   1 foobar foobar_users  667 Mar 16 19:51 foo.txt
   6 -rwxrwxr-x   1 foobar foobar_users  408 Mar 16 19:51 a.out

Here we see two directories and two files. The permissions are shown in the first column of the listing. The user owner is the third column and the group owner is the fourth column. The permissions are shown via the 10-character string. The first character (either d or - here) tells us what kind of thing is shown: d for directory and - for regular file (there are other kinds of "things" in a Linux file system, but those are beyond the scope of this discussion). The rest of the columns show the file mode.

The file mode is divided into three sections. The first applies to the user onwer, the second to the group owner, and the third to all other users. These fields are then divided into three letters, one for each permission granted: r for read, w for write, and x for execute.

The first row above shows a directory that is only accessible by user foobar. This user is allowed to change to the bin directory, see what files are in that directory, and allowed to put new files into that directory. The second row shows a publically accessible directory that is both user and group writable. Here anyone can change to and see the contents of the lib directory. However, only foobar and members of foobar_users are allowed to create files in that directory.

The third and forth rows show files. The first file is readable by everyone, but only writeable by foobar. The second file is readable and executable by everyone, but is only writable by foobar or members of foobar_users.

Changing File Mode

If you need to change the mode of a file or directory, you may do so with the chmod command. The chmod command takes two or more options. The first option is the permission changes you wish to make and the rest of the arguments are the files to change. (The actual command is a lot more flexible, but you may find out more about that by typing man chmod.)

The permission changes are specified in three parts: (1) whose permissions are being changed, (2) stating that permissions are being added or removed, and (3) what access is being granted or revoked.

The first, or "who", part of the options are specified with one or more letters: u for user, g for group, o for other, and a for all.

The second part is specified with either the plus (+) sign to grant permission or the minus (-) sign to revoke permission.

The third part is specified with the same letters as were used by ls when viewing permissions: r for read, w for write, and x for execute.

For example:

   1 chmod a+rx script.pl
   2 chmod og-w file.txt
   3 chmod ug+rw source.c

The first line above would grant read and execute permission to all users on the file named script.pl. The second line would revoke write permissions on file.txt for other users and the group owner. The third would grant read and write permissions to the user owner and group owner on source.c.

Notice that this doesn't say anything about the existing permissions. For example, in the second line above, the user may not be allowed to write to the file either if the user was never granted that permission.

Absolute File mode

Advanced users may want to specify the mode quickly and exactly. This can be done by specifying the numeric file mode directly. The file mode may be specified as an octal number where the last three digits represent each of the three levels of access, user, group, and other, respectively. Each digit then specifies all three read, write, and execute for each of the three fields. Read is specified by the digit 4, write by 2, and execute by 1. Adding these together will get the overall permission.

For example:

   1 chmod 755 script.pl
   2 chmod 644 file.txt
   3 chmod 660 source.c

After running these commands, we would see something like the following listing (note the first column especially):

   1 foobar@camaro src$ ls -l
   2 total 3
   3 -rwxr-xr-x   1 foobar foobar_users   432 Mar 10 12:40 script.pl
   4 -rw-r--r--   1 foobar foobar_users  2590 Mar  8 17:22 file.txt
   5 -rw-rw----   1 foobar foobar_users   596 Mar 12  7:04 source.c

Again see the man-page for chmod for details.

What about the /tmp directory?

Whenever working on a Linux system in the department, please be aware of the /tmp directory since it allows you to store files for a short time without affecting your quota. If you need to download a large file or work with some large files that you don't need to work with for long and can't fit into your home directory, you can place these files in /tmp, which is stored on the local disk of the current machine.

However, there are some things you should be aware of when using the the /tmp folder. First, filling up all space in the /tmp folder is a bad idea. You can cause certain programs on the system to freeze up if there is no room left on the drive, which may make working on that computer difficult. Second, the temporary folder is temporary and the systems staff clean up these folders regularly. Any file in the /tmp directory will be deleted after 24 hours. Finally, anything stored in /tmp will not be backed up during our nightly backup process, so when the files are deleted from the /tmp folder, they are gone for good.

How can I change the default app used to open files?

Note: This is for GNOME & Xfce

Changing Default PDF Application

You can run the "pdfdefault.sh" script to prevent GIMP or another application from being the default for opening pdf files. This script sets evince as the default application.

$ /common/public/bin/pdfdefault.sh

Changing Other Default Applications

If you want to make changes to any other defaults you can edit the defaults.list file

$ vim ~/.local/share/applications/defaults.list

You can also right click a file on the desktop and select properties and then select a different application from the "Open With" drop-down box.

How do I use CVS?

Repository

CVS may use either a local repository or a remote repository. In general, CVS provides access to several kinds of remote repository, but the CIS systems only support the remote shell remote repository. Whenever running CVS you must tell the program where to find the repository. You can do this either by specifying the -d option to the cvs command or by setting the CVSROOT environment.

If the repository is stored in a CIS home directory, you may use a local repository, which is specified with just the directory name::

   1 /research/lbs/cvsroot

If the directory will be used on a laptop or other "remote" machine, then you must specify a remote shell repository::

   1 :ext:tamtoft@cislinux.cis.ksu.edu:/research/lbs/cvsroot

I prefer the latter in all cases because I can then copy the entire repository or zip it up and place it on another machine and use it as is. You may do whichever you prefer. If you do this, you will also need to make sure the CVS_RSH environment variable is set to ssh::

   1 export CVS_RSH="ssh"

As I stated above, these must be given to the CVSROOT environment or to the -d option::

   1 export CVSROOT=":ext:tamtoft@cislinux.cis.ksu.edu:/research/lbs/cvsroot"
   2 cvs ...
   3 
   4 # OR
   5 
   6 cvs -d/research/lbs/cvsroot ...

Commands

After the cvs command (and other basic options, such as -d), you specify the name of a command. The most common commands are import, checkout, update, add, remove, commit, and export.

Import

Import creates a new project in the CVS repository. You must first create a simple project directory containing at least one file (or it could be a complete, existing project). Change into that directory and run:

   1 cvs -d... import -kkv projectname tamtoft start

This will use the contents of the current directory (and all it's subdirectories) to create a new package in the CVS repository. It will name that project projectname assign the branch vendor tag as tamtoft (probably don't need to worry about what that means), and sets the version as start. The -kkv also says that all files imported should be treated as text for keyword replacements. If this is not the case, you should use -kb instead. I recommend running:

   1 cvs -d... import -h

for more details or see the man-page for CVS or go to http://www.cvshome.org/ for on-line documentation.

Checkout

After import, you need to check out a version controlled directory (the import directory is unmodified). You can do this by changing out of the current directory into your work directory and then running:

   1 cvs -d... checkout projectname

This will create a directory named projectname in the current directory. This will be your local work directory for the project. At the start of each work cycle, you will want to use the update command to synchronize your work to the current repository (in case others have made changes). When you are done making changes, you will use the commit command to push your changes into the main repository.

Update

At the start of each work cycle you may use this command to synchronize your local copy to all the work committed to the central repository by changing into your local work directory and running:

   1 cvs update

Notice that you don't need to specify the CVSROOT with this command as it is specified by your local repository inside of the CVS metadata directory.

This command is also useful when used to check the status of the repository by turning changes off:

   1 cvs -n update

This will show you the current status of your local work directory giving you information about which files you have changed, which files in the central repository are different from local copies, and where conflicts exist.

Add

This command is used to add files and directories to the repository by calling:

   1 cvs add files...

You can add multiple files and directories at a time. You cannot add files until you have added the directory they are in. After adding, you will need to commit your changes using the commit command.

Remove

This command is used to remove files or all files in a directory from the repository by running::

   1 cvs remove -f files...

The -f tells CVS to remove the file at the same time as marking it for removal from the repository. You will need to commit your changes using the commit command when done.

Commit

This command is used to upload all of your local changes to the master repository. In the case of conflicts, it will give you instructions on how to merge changes and then upload a new copy. Most of the time it will just try to do the right the thing:

   1 cvs commit

Export

When you want to package up the project without the CVS metadata directories, you run an export. From a top-level directory run:

   1 cvs export projectname

You will now have a clean copy of the repository, but this copy should not be used for editing.

Other Information

For more detailed information, I recommend using the -h option to cvs to get help or see the documentation available at CVS Help







Network Questions

What network storage is available to me?

All CIS users have storage on the department file server. The default quota is set at 2GB, but can usually be increased at any time if a request is sent to systems support staff (help@cis.ksu.edu). Anything you place in your home directory is backed up nightly, with revisions stored going back six months.

On department linux systems, your home directory is automatically mounted as $HOME. The full path to your home directory can be found if you use the finger command on yourself on any linux host.

$ finger testacct
Login: testacct                         Name: Testing Tester
Directory: /home/ugrads/testacct        Shell: /bin/bash
Never logged in.
No mail.
No Plan.

In this case, testacct's home directory is /home/ugrads/testacct.

On department Windows systems, your home directory should be mounted as the U: drive. If you are manually mounting a drive, use the URI \\homefiles.cis.ksu.edu\<username> where <username> is your login.

If you need a large amount of space temporarily, you can request space in the transient volume (send an email to help@cis.ksu.edu). There are no quotas on directories in this volume, but there are also no backups made of files here. Support staff may also ask you to clean files out periodically to make room for others. On department linux systems, your transient directory will be found in /transient/<username. On department Windows systems, you can mount the share \\homefiles.cis.ksu.edu\transient\<username> to a drive letter of your choosing.

How do I setup CGI on my web page?

This question has been answered in the CIS UserGuide. Please see the section on UserGuide/WebPages.

Why don't you have an FTP server?

FTP is a very old protocol. It was designed before security considerations were a major part of protocol design. As such, passwords to the FTP server are sent in plain text---any clever user on the network can snoop your packets and steal your password. This would allow that user to gain access to your account, which is an unacceptable violation of our security.

If you need to access your home directory from a remote location, there are two different methods for doing so. See the documentation in the CIS Systems UserGuide for Remote Access or in the FrequentlyAskedQuestions about how to access your home directory from a non-CIS computer.

How do I backup data to CIS?

To setup an automated backup from a linux or OS X laptop to CIS filesystems follow these steps:

First, make sure that you have a $HOME/bin directory on your laptop.

mkdir -p $HOME/bin
chmod u+rwx $HOME/bin

Next, copy this script to $HOME/bin/backup_to_cis.sh on your laptop. You will need to change the DIRECTORIES variable to whichever directories from your home directory on your laptop that need backed up.::

   1 #!/usr/bin/env bash
   2   
   3 ###
   4 # Script to backup laptop home directory files to CIS home directory
   5 ###
   6  
   7 # These are the directories that will be backed up from your homedir.
   8 # For example: If I have ~/docs and ~/proposals that I want backed up,
   9 #              I would change the next line to:
  10 #              DIRECTORIES="docs proposals"
  11 DIRECTORIES="dir1 dir2"
  12   
  13 test_exists () {
  14     which $1 > /dev/null 2>&1
  15     return $?
  16 }
  17   
  18 die () {
  19     echo $1
  20     exit 1
  21 }
  22   
  23 CIS_BACKUP_DIR="~/laptop_backups"
  24 CIS_SERVER="linux.cis.ksu.edu"
  25 RSYNC_OPTS="--archive --delete --rsh=ssh --quiet"
  26 UTILITIES="ssh rsync"
  27   
  28 # Ensure that ssh and rsync exist
  29 for UTILITY in ${UTILITIES}; do
  30     test_exists ${UTILITY} || die "Couldn't find ${UTILITY}"
  31 done
  32   
  33 # Ensure that each directory exists locally; then copy it to CIS
  34 for DIR in ${DIRECTORIES}; do
  35     if [ ! -d ${HOME}/${DIR} ]; then
  36         echo "Could not find ${HOME}/${DIR} -- skipping"
  37     else
  38         rsync ${RSYNC_OPTS} ${HOME}/${DIR} ${CIS_SERVER}:${CIS_BACKUP_DIR}/
  39     fi
  40 done

Next, make sure your script is executable.::

chmod u+rwx $HOME/bin/backup_to_cis.sh

Next, setup ssh keys as outlined in this FAQ.

Next, setup a cronjob to run this script. Run crontab -e as your user and add the following line if you want to backup at midnight every day. Run man 5 crontab if you want a different time and do not know the crontab format.

0 0 * * * ${HOME}/bin/backup_to_cis.sh

Obviously, your laptop will need to be turned on with a network connection for a backup to take place. You can always run the backup script manually by executing this command.

$HOME/bin/backup_to_cis.sh

To setup an automated backup from a Windows laptop to CIS filesystems follow these steps:

First, you'll need to create a directory in your homedir to save backups. On a Windows lab machine, this is your U:. If you are doing this remotely, you can connect to our network remotely by following this document.

Map your remote homedir to your local computer by going up one directory, right Finally, customize whatever additional options you'd like for your backup click on your username and choose Map Network Drive.

After you've created your backup folder in your homedir, you will now need to download and install Cobian Backup.

Follow the on-screen instructions for installing Cobian Backup on your personal workstation.

After Cobian Backup is installed, a moon image should appear in your system tray (on the bottom right of your screen), or you may simply launch it by going to your `Start Menu > All Programs > Cobian Backup > Cobian Backup Interface`.

Click on the Tasks pane on your left to active that tab. Right click inside it's window and choose Add Task. Name your task in the Task Name field and modify other settings in that tab as needed. Click on the Files tab on the top of that window to add the files you'd like backed up on the CIS Systems. In the destination section under the Files tab click on the open folder (Add A Directory) and choose the folder inside the mapped network drive you just created.

Next you can schedule your backups via the Schedule tab (Daily, Weekly, Monthly, etc.).

Finally, customize whatever additional options you'd like for your backup if you deem them necessary. Click OK.

Your backups will now run according to the schedule you indicated on the Schedule tab automatically (providing your computer is turned on during that time period).

How do I forward my CIS email somewhere else?

This question has been answered in the CIS UserGuide. Please see the section on UserGuide/Email.

How do I use HTTP authentication?

To setup password authentication for a directory in your personal web space follow these steps from a linux shell (you will want to change passwordProtectedDir to whatever name you want and use your own usernames). <your_home_dir_path> is the full path to your home directory. If you don't know what this is, use the finger command from the command prompt of any linux host ("finger <eid>", where <eid> is your eID).

   1 cd ~/public_html/
   2 mkdir passwordProtectedDir
   3 cd passwordProtectedDir
   4 htpasswd -c .htpasswd user_who_gets_access
   5 htpasswd .htpasswd other_user
   6 cat << EOF > ~/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/.htaccess
   7 AuthType Basic
   8 AuthName "Checking Password"
   9 AuthUserFile <your_home_dir_path>/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/.htpasswd
  10 Require valid-user
  11 EOF

Now create any files you want in the directory and set permissions appropriately.

chmod o+rx ~/public_html/passwordProtectedDir
chmod o+r ~/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/*.*

If you would like your files to only be password protected off-campus, use this command to make your htaccess file.

cat << EOF > ~/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/.htaccess
AuthType Basic
AuthName "Checking Password"
AuthUserFile <your_home_dir_path>/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/.htpasswd
Require valid-user
Order Allow,Deny
# This restricts access without a password to the KSU network
Allow from 129.130.0.0/16
# This restricts access without a password to the CIS network
#Allow from 129.130.8.0/22
Satisfy any
EOF

Why am I getting 500 Interal Server Error on all my scripts?

We use programs named suexec and suphp to make sure that all of your scripts run as you. This allows your scripts to access files that would normally be private and inaccessible by the web server. However, for security these programs will not allow your scripts to run unless the permissions set on your files and on the directories containing them are safe.

For CGI scripts, you must make sure the following are true:

1. Your script must be stored in your home directory in the subdirectory named public_html/cgi-bin. You cannot place your scripts anywhere else.

2. You must make sure that your home directory, the public_html directory, and the cgi-bin directory are not group or other writable:

  • chmod 755 ~
    chmod 755 ~/public_html
    chmod 755 ~/public_html/cgi-bin

3. Finally, you must make sure your scripts are executable, but not group or other writable:

  • chmod 755 ~/public_html/cgi-bin/my-script.cgi

4. If you have problems, try checking the end of the logs for additional information while pressing reload on your browser:

  • tail -f /web/logs/error_log /web/logs/suexec_log

For PHP scripts, you must make sure the following are true:

1. Your script must be stored in your home directory under the directory named public_html or a subdirectory of that directory.

2. You must make sure that your home directory, the public_html directory, and every directory above your PHP script is accessible but not group or other writable:

  • chmod 755 ~
    chmod 755 ~/public_html
    chmod 755 ~/public_html/otherdir

3. Finally, you must make sure your scripts are readable, but not group or other writable:

  • chmod 644 ~/public_html/index.php
    chmod 644 ~/public_html/otherdir/index.php

4. If you have problems, try checking the end of the logs for additional information while pressing reload on your browser:

  • tail -f /web/logs/error_log /web/logs/suphp_log

How do I setup ssh keys?

To setup ssh keys for authentication between CIS Linux and Solaris hosts, follow these steps

chmod go-w ~
cd ~/.ssh/
chmod 700 .
ssh-keygen -t dsa
cat id_dsa.pub >> authorized_keys2
chmod 600 *

How do I access the wireless network in Nichols?

The CIS Wireless network is now managed by the K-State Computing and Network Services (CNS) department. To gain access to the network, you will need to have a valid eID and follow these instructions listed on the CNS website.

How do I access the wired network in Nichols?

The CIS wired network only allows registered hosts to connect. If you wish to use your own system on the CIS network, please send an email to help@cis.ksu.edu with the MAC (hardware) address of your network card and your hostname. Most requests are handled within the hour if submitted during business hours (8AM-5PM, Monday-Friday). Once you have received notice that your registration request has been approved, please reboot or restart your network connection.

How do I access the campus VPN?

Please see the K-State page on how to download, install, and use the VPN client for off-campus connection.

http://www.k-state.edu/infotech/networks/vpn/

How do I login remotely to CIS resources?

As of August, 2012, ITS Security team is blocking remote access to desktop computers from off-campus. Only certain systems will be available from off-campus.

Windows (Remote Desktop):

  • remote.cis.ksu.edu (uses your CIS login)
  • remote-ksu.cis.ksu.edu (uses your KSU eID login)

Linux (SSH):

  • cislinux.cis.ksu.edu

There are no publicly-accessible Mac hosts in our department, only systems that are owned or used by individuals or projects.

Wireless users please note: For SSH or RDP access to our remote access servers, you may not be connected to the "KSU Guest" wireless network. This network only allows web traffic (http/https) and nothing else. You must be connected to "KSU Wireless" or "KSU Housing" if you are on-campus.

If you need access to any other CIS system and don't want to go through one of the above hosts first, you may install the campus VPN client on your remote systems (home desktops, laptops, etc), which you can download here: http://www.ksu.edu/its/security/vpn/. When you run it, you should login with your KSU eID and connect using the "Full Tunnel" option. This routes all your desktop network traffic through the KSU network, effectively putting your desktop behind the campus firewall. You can now use Remote Desktop or SSH client to connect to any CIS system.




Miscellaneous Questions

How do I connect to Oracle?

Before you can access your Oracle database schema, you must contact the system administrators to request an account.

Once the administrators have notified you that your account has been created, you may connect using the following instructions.

Connecting from Microsoft Windows

You can contact the Oracle server from any Windows lab machine by logging in as yourself (using your CIS username and password) on the machine. Then go to:

Start > All Programs > Oracle - OraHome90 > Application Development > SQL Plus

Now, logon to Oracle using your Oracle username and password. In the Host String: field you should enter oracle.

Connecting from Linux

You can connect to the Oracle server from any machine in the department using the sqlplus client as follows:

sqlplus username@oracle

where you put your username in place of username and then enter your Oracle password.

Connecting from Java

First, you will need to locate the JAR file for the version of Java that you will use to connect to the server. The drivers are available for download from the CIS Oracle web server.

The file you need will depend upon the version of Java you will be using:

classes111: Java 1.1
classes12:  Java 1.2, 1.3
ojdbc14:    Java 1.4, 1.5

The names of the files will have a trailing .zip or .jar. It makes no difference which you choose. Unless you know you need them, you can ignore the files labeled _g or named somethign else.

Once you've added that appropriate Java JAR file to your CLASSPATH, you will need to include this code snippet in your program:

   1 Class.forName("oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver");
   2 Connection conn = DriverManager.getConnection(
   3     "jdbc:oracle:thin:@oracle.cis.ksu.edu:1521:ORACLE", 
   4     "username", "password");

where you will replace username and password with your Oracle username and password.

Connecting from the web

You can find the iSQL*Plus web gateway at http://oracle.cis.ksu.edu/isqlplus. You will be redirected to a secure connection from URL.

General Connection Information

If you are connecting from another language or need more advanced support, you may find the following information helpful:

Oracle Host: oracle.cis.ksu.edu
Oracle Port: 1521
Oracle Home: /oracle/home/product/9.2.0.1.0
Oracle SID:  ORACLE
Oracle UID:  oracle.cis.ksu.edu

We also keep a local copy of the Oracle server documentation on the Oracle web server for your convenience.

If you have any other questions or problems, please send a request to the system administrators.

How do I change my Oracle password?

Connect to the Oracle server using sqlplus on the commandline, or via the iSQL*Plus web interface.

Once there, issue the following SQL statement:

alter user user_name identified by new_password;

Where user_name is your user name and new_password is the password you wish to use.

Oracle passwords must meet all of the following restrictions:

  1. Passwords can be from 1 to 30 characters.
  2. The first character in an Oracle password must be a letter.
  3. Only letters, numbers, and the symbols “#”, “_” and “$” are acceptable in a password.

How do I connect to MySQL?

Before you can access your MySQL database, you must request an account by sending an email to help@cis.ksu.edu.

Once your account has been created, you may connect using the instructions below.

You can connect to the MySQL server from any host on the campus network. You will not be able to connect to it from off-campus unless you use the KSU VPN client, which you can download here. Campus wifi users: you will not be able to connect if you are on the "KSU Guest" wifi network. If you are on wifi, you must be using the "KSU Wireless" network.

Connecting from Linux

To connect from Linux, you must first logon to one of the lab machines (or you may connect from your own laptop). Once logged in, you can connect to the MySQL server by typing:

mysql -p -h mysql.cis.ksu.edu

and then enter your MySQL password when prompted.

Using phpMyAdmin

To administer your database through a web interface, you can use phpMyAdmin from any Internet-connected computer.

How do I change my MySQL password?

There are a couple of ways to change your password:

  • Connect using the command above. Once connected, type the following at the prompt
     set password = password("yournewpassword");

    Where yournewpassword is your new password.

How do I reset my MySQL password?

Send an email to support@cis.ksu.edu or stop by the sysadmin offices (N116, N117) during regular business hours.

General Connection Information

You may find the following information helpful:

MySQL Host: mysql.cis.ksu.edu
MySQL Port: 3306

A copy of the MySQL 5.0 documentation can be find at the MySQL homepage.

If you have any other questions or problems, please send a request to the system administrators.

What happens when I leave? How long do I keep my account?

Please see the "Alumni Accounts and Account Removal" section of UserGuide/Accounts.

Can you guys help me with my homework?

We want to make our policy on helping students clear. The CIS support staff is responsible for making sure the computing systems, networks, services, and programs on those systems function. We will help anyone who has a problem using these systems.

However, we draw the line at looking at any source code or server or program configurations students themselves have installed. This is due to the fact that CIS faculty are frequently asking students to configure and manipulate software on their own as part of homework assignments. As such the CIS support staff explicitly do not examine source code or other issues for students.

If you are convinced that this problem is indeed an issue related to a CIS systems bug or misconfiguration, you may contact your professor and ask for assistance. At the specific request of faculty members we will look into source code or other issues, but only in order to determine the location of the problem.

As an additional clarification, this policy doesn't preclude us from answering questions and giving advice to students. The systems coordinator and students may volunteer to render help or give advice at their discretion. Please be sure your requests for advice are keeping with your professors' honor code requirements for the applicable course.

What do I do when the printer is out of paper?

If one of the printers runs out of paper, you just need to contact the system administrators. We get paper and load the printers on request.

Alternately, if no one is available at those locations you may either email support or talk to one of the staff members in the main CIS office, Nichols 234.

How do I use VMWare in the Computing Labs

Please read our guide for full details on using a VM image for classwork.

How do I install JPF (Java PathFinder)?

Initial Steps

The JPF install script may be run from cislinux.cis.ksu.edu or any CIS Linux lab machine. Windows users must ssh into cislinux using Putty or another ssh client.

Once you have completed the installation from any Linux machine, it will work on any other CIS Linux machine.

  1. Log into cislinux.cis.ksu.edu (or any CIS Linux lab machine). All following command should be run in a terminal session or terminal window.
  2. Make sure the Sun JDK is in your system path. You should see something like this:
    $ set | grep JAVA_HOME
    JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/default-java
    $ set | grep PATH
    PATH=/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/games:/usr/lib/jvm/default-java

    JAVA_HOME could also be something like /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun. If JAVA_HOME is not set and not also in PATH, you will need to add the following to your ~/.profile:

    export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/default-java
    export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME
    Logout and back in to load the new configuration, or just reload it for your current session
    $ source ~/.profile
  3. Now you can run the install script which will place the JPF files in your home directory and build them:
    $ /common/public/bin/install_jpf.sh

    You will now have a built copy of JPF in ~/JPF2.

Running JPF

Create the following shell scripts to help you build and run JPF test classes:

compile.sh

JPF=$HOME/JPF2/
CLASSPATH=.:$JPF/jpf-core/build/jpf/
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/lib/*
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/src/main/
javac -cp $CLASSPATH $1

run.sh

JPF=$HOME/JPF2/
CLASSPATH=.:$JPF/jpf-core/build/*
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/lib/*
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/build/classes/
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/bin/
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/src/main/

ARGS="+vm.por.sync_detection=false"
ARGS=$ARGS" +jpf.report.console.property_violation=trace,error,snapshot"
ARGS=$ARGS" +jpf.listener=.tools.DeadlockAnalyzer"
ARGS=$ARGS" +deadlock.format=essential"

java -Xmx512m -jar $JPF/jpf-core/build/RunJPF.jar +classpath=$CLASSPATH  $ARGS $1

Place them somewhere in your homedir (in your JPF2 directory is probably a good place) and make them executable

$ chmod +x compile.sh
$ chmod +x run.sh

See your instructor for how to use these scripts.

For More Information

Please see the Java PathFinder site:

http://javapathfinder.sourceforge.net/

How do I use PC^2 for the ACM Programming Contest?

PC2 is used for submitting solutions and scoring for the ACM Programming Contest. You may either use a local fat client (pc2team) or the web client (EWTeam).

Web Client: EWTeam

Point a web browser to http://pc2.cis.ksu.edu and login with the credentials provided by the contest coordinator. This should work for all browsers and all operating systems. You can also look at the current scoreboard from this app.

Local Client: pc2team

To use the local client, you must install it in at least one team member's home directory.

Previously Installed Copy

If you used PC2 for previous contests, you must remove the old directory before installing the current one. Look for a "pc2" directory on your U: drive or in your home directory and delete it before continuing.

Installation

  1. Login to a Linux lab machine, or open an SSH session using PuTTY or another SSH client to cislinux.cis.ksu.edu
  2. Run the install script
    • $ /common/public/bin/install_pc2.sh

Running

  • In Windows
    1. Open a Command Prompt window (click Start->Programs->Accessories->Command Prompt, or Start->Run and type cmd)

    2. Change to your home files (U: drive) and enter the pc2 directory
      • > U:
        > cd pc2
    3. Start the PC2 client
      • U:\pc2>bin\pc2team
      • You cannot run pc2team by double-clicking on it in Windows Explorer, you must start it from the command prompt as described here.
  • In Linux
    1. Open a terminal window
    2. Enter the pc2 directory in your home directory
      • $ cd $HOME/pc2
    3. Start the PC^2 client
      • $ bin/pc2team
  • Login using the credentials provided to you by the judges.
  • Note 1: you must run the pc2team application as described here, do not cd bin first and then run pc2team, otherwise the client will not be able to read its configuration file and you will not be able to connect to the server.

  • Note 2: if you wish to view the current scoreboard, you may run the application pc2board instead of pc2team in the last step listed above.

Usage

Full documentation of the pc2team client can be found in the pc2 install directory in your home directory. Look in the doc directory for the file PC2V9TeamGuide.pdf.

How do I use the Adobe Acrobat Connect Server?

In-Depth How-To

How to use the Adobe Connect service

Creating Accounts

Only some department users (primarily faculty) are permitted to have accounts which can be used to create and administer meetings.

I need some software by VMWare for a project, can you give it to me?

Possibly. Our licensing with VMWare, via the VMware Academic Program, allows us to give students software and licenses to install software on their own computers, for a period of 12 months at a time. Software may be obtained from the VMWare webstore. At the beginning of each semester, we update the online database with a list of all students currently enrolled in a CIS class. When we do this, you will receive an email from "Kansas State University, Manhattan - Computing and Info. Sciences" which contains a link that you will need to click to activate your account and set a password for it. Zimbra mail will sometimes flag this as spam, so if you don't see it in your Inbox, please check in your Spam/Junk folders to see if it is filtered there.

If your account is currently active or previously added but you never activated it, you will not receive an email. If you previously had an account that had been deactivated (accounts are deactivated automatically after one year from their creation), you will receive an email saying your account has been reactivated. If you don't remember your password in either of these cases, click on the "Forgot you password?" link on the site login page. Your username will always be <your_eid>@ksu.edu.

Once your account is confirmed, you can login to the webstore any time at the following URL:

http://e5.onthehub.com/WebStore/ProductsByMajorVersionList.aspx?ws=5e4dba18-d630-de11-a497-0030485a8df0&vsro=8

You are free to download any software available on this site. Software available for students from the VMware Academic Program includes desktop applications, such as Fusion (for Mac OS), Workstation (for Linux and Windows), and Player (for all platforms). You can also get a discount code for enrollment in the VMWare Certified Professional program. Software for faculty includes all of these plus vSphere and vCenter products, as well as ESXi and ESX.

Remember, this is for you own personal use as a CIS student. You are not legally permitted to download software for your friends or families. Doing so will break the terms of the agreement. Distributing illegal copies of software is against state and federal laws and the policies of this university.

How do I install IBM Rational Software Architect?

The installation files can be found in the public file share. In Windows, this is \\files.cis.ksu.edu\pub and in Linux, this is /pub. Once you have opened this share, change to the software\IBM\Rational directory. Select the directory for edition you want to install (most users will want the standard edition in the RSA_8.5 directory, but the others are available if you need them. Use the following directions to complete the installation. Both steps must be completed.

Note: This is for installing on Windows, but Linux installation is similar.

Step 1: Suite Installation

  1. Open the Setup\install_windows folder and run install.exe

  2. Click on "Install Rational Software Architect"
  3. Make sure all boxes are checked on the initial "Install Packages" screen and click Next, and then Next again

  4. Accept the license terms and click Next

  5. Change install directories if desired (defaults should be fine) and click Next

  6. Change install directory for "Software Delivery Platform" and/or architecture if desired and click Next

  7. It is usually best to let it install the bundled Eclipse environment, but you can choose an existing one if you wish and click Next to continue

  8. Select additional features if desired and click Next

  9. Select how you want help files delivered and click Next

  10. Click Install to start installing files (this will take a while)

  11. Click Finish when done

Step 2: License Installation

  1. Select the "IBM Installation Manager" from the Start menu
  2. Click on Manage Licenses

  3. Select "IBM Rational Software Architect" from the list, click "Import product Activation Kit", and then Next to continue

  4. Browse to the folder you installed from and into the Activation_Kit folder there and open the .jar file in that folder, click Next to continue

  5. Accept the license terms and click Finish to install the license

  6. Click Finish when done and close the Installation Manager

When I run Visual Paradigm UML, I am asked to select a license

Installing the license locally

If you are running Visual Paradigm UML on a CIS Windows lab machine, you need the license file installed for your user profile. You can do this by clicking on Start>All Programs>Visual Paradigm>Install Visual Paradigm License. You will be shown a security warning about running an program on the network, click "Run" to approve. Press any key when prompted to close the Command Prompt window. Restart Visual Paradigm and it should run normally.

If you are running Visual Paradigm UML on your own Windows machine, you will need to download the license file here, and copy it to the following location: %USERPROFILE%\visualparadigm\.vplls. Create this folder if it doesn't exist (in a command prompt):

C:\> mkdir %USERPROFILE%\visualparadigm\.vplls

Workaround for Campus Firewall Blocking

If you are running VP-UML on your own system and trying to use it on campus, you need to update the JRE included with the application. You will first need to download a new JRE from http://www.java.com and extract it to your local harddrive. Then follow these steps to place it in the correct folder for VP-UML to use it in Windows.

  1. Close Visual Paradigm if running
  2. Rename jre folder in C:\Program Files\Visual Paradigm for UML 10.0 to jre.bak

  3. Copy jre1.7.0_17 folder from where you extracted it to C:\Program Files\Visual Paradigm for UML 10.0

  4. Rename jre1.7.0_17 folder in C:\Program Files\Visual Paradigm for UML 10.0 to jre

  5. Start Visual Paradigm; you should see dialog that says "Academic license Key is received"
  6. Close Visual Paradigm and run VP-UML Update from the Start menu under Visual Paradigm

  7. Confirm no VP apps are running and click "OK" on the dialog box
  8. Make sure "Visual Paradigm update server" is selected and click "Check Update"
  9. Only apply updates to 10.0, do not upgrade to 10.1 if offered
  10. Close when done