Contents

  1. Windows Questions
    1. How can I use Pexus X-Deep/32 on my own computer?
    2. I need some software by Microsoft for a project, can you give it to me?
    3. How do I take a screenshot in Windows?
    4. How do I enable X forwarding in Windows?
    5. How do I transfer files to or from the CIS systems?
    6. How do I burn an .ISO image to a Disc?
  2. Linux Questions
    1. How do I get started with Linux?
      1. Getting Connected
      2. Transferring files (SCP or SFTP)
        1. Using a Command-Line Interface (CLI)
          1. Example: transfer a file called myfile.txt in your current folder to your home directory on CISLinux.
      3. Linux Lingo
      4. Basic Linux Commands
      5. General CLI Notes
      6. Some Practical Examples
          1. Navigating and listing directories
          2. Working with files
    2. What are "Linux file permissions"?
      1. Ownership
      2. File Mode
      3. Viewing File Permissions
      4. Changing File Mode
      5. Absolute File mode
      6. General Note About Directories
    3. What about the /tmp directory?
    4. I can't login to the Linux lab
  3. Network Questions
    1. What network storage is available to me?
    2. How do I setup CGI on my web page?
    3. Why don't you have an FTP server?
    4. How do I backup data to CIS?
    5. How do I forward my CIS email somewhere else?
    6. How do I use HTTP authentication?
    7. Why am I getting 500 Interal Server Error on all my scripts?
    8. How do I setup ssh keys?
    9. How do I access the wireless network in Nichols?
    10. How do I access the wired network in Nichols?
    11. How do I access the campus VPN?
    12. How do I login remotely to CIS resources?
  4. Miscellaneous Questions
    1. How do I connect to Oracle?
      1. Connecting from Microsoft Windows
      2. Connecting from Linux
      3. Connecting from Java
      4. Connecting from the web
      5. General Connection Information
      6. How do I change my Oracle password?
    2. How do I connect to MySQL?
      1. Connecting from Linux
      2. Using phpMyAdmin
      3. How do I change my MySQL password?
      4. How do I reset my MySQL password?
      5. General Connection Information
    3. What happens when I leave? How long do I keep my account?
    4. Can you guys help me with my homework?
    5. What do I do when the printer is out of paper?
    6. How do I use VMWare in the Computing Labs
    7. How do I install JPF (Java PathFinder)?
      1. Initial Steps
      2. Running JPF
      3. For More Information
    8. How do I use PC^2 for the ACM Programming Contest?
      1. Web Client: EWTeam
      2. Local Client: pc2team
        1. Previously Installed Copy
        2. Installation
        3. Running
        4. Usage
    9. How do I use the Adobe Acrobat Connect Server?
      1. In-Depth How-To
      2. Creating Accounts
    10. I need some software by VMWare for a project, can you give it to me?
    11. How do I install IBM Rational Software Architect?
      1. Step 1: Suite Installation
      2. Step 2: License Installation
    12. When I run Visual Paradigm UML, I am asked to select a license
      1. Installing the license locally
      2. Workaround for Campus Firewall Blocking




Windows Questions

How can I use Pexus X-Deep/32 on my own computer?

First, you will need to go to the Pexus_ web site and download and install the current version of X-Deep/32. Install this according to their instructions. Since X-Deep/32 changed to freeware, you no longer need to request a license from the systems administrators to use this product. The CIS Systems Administration staff will be reviewing our official policy concerning the support of X-Deep/32 versus other X-Server applications for Windows.

I need some software by Microsoft for a project, can you give it to me?

Possibly. Our licensing with Microsoft allows us to give students software and licenses to install software on their own computers. Software may be obtained from the MSDN Academic Alliance Software Center. At the beginning of each semester, we update the online database with a list of all students currently enrolled in a CIS class. When we do this, you will receive an email from the DreamSpark Premium Webstore which contains a link that you will need to click to activate your account and set a password for it. Zimbra mail will sometimes flag this as spam, so if you don't see it in your Inbox, please check in your Spam/Junk folders to see if it is filtered there.

If your account is currently active or previously added but you never activated it, you will not receive an email. If you previously had an account that had been deactivated (accounts are deactivated automatically after one year from their creation), you will receive an email saying your account has been reactivated. If you don't remember your password in either of these cases, click on the "Forgot you password?" link on the site login page. Your username will always be <your_eid>@ksu.edu.

Once your account is confirmed, you can login to the webstore any time at the following URL:

http://e5.onthehub.com/WebStore/ProductsByMajorVersionList.aspx?ws=ee42c86a-bd9b-e011-969d-0030487d8897&vsro=8

You are free to download any software available on this site. You must use MS Internet Explorer to download software from E-Academy. Software available from E-Academy includes development tools and suites, operating systems, and some MS Office component applications, but not the Office suite or core applications such as Word, Excel, or Powerpoint. If you would like your own copy of the Office quite, you may purchase it from the Union Computer Store at a student discounted priced.

Remember, this is for you own personal use as a CIS student. You are not legally permitted to download software for your friends or families. Doing so will break the terms of the MSDNAA agreement. Distributing illegal copies of software is against state and federal laws and the policies of this university.

Your initial password is automatically generated when your account is added. You should change it as soon as possible by clicking on the "Your Account" link at the top of the page once you login.

How do I take a screenshot in Windows?

To take a screenshot (image of the screen) in Windows, follow the following steps:

  1. Press "Print Scrn" on the keyboard (next to "Scroll Lock" at the top).
  2. Open Microsoft Paint (Start Menu > All Programs > Accessories > Paint).

  3. Go to Edit > Paste to paste the image.

  4. Save the image as a BMP in your home directory by going to File > Save As...

  5. Do with the image as you please.

How do I enable X forwarding in Windows?

The following explains the process of enabling X forwarding through SSH to view X applications in Windows.

  1. Start XServer by going to Start > XServer

  2. Open PuTTY by going to Start > PuTTY

  3. In the Category menu for PuTTY, select Tunnels
  4. Check the box next to "Enable X11 Forwarding"
  5. In the Category menu for PuTTY, select Session
  6. Under Host Name, type "cislinux.cis.ksu.edu"
  7. Choose SSH as your Protocol
  8. Now click "Open"
  9. Enter your username and password when prompted
  10. Enjoy

You can test to see if X forwarding is working by typing "xeyes", which should bring up an application with two eyes following your mouse pointer.

How do I transfer files to or from the CIS systems?

NOTE: Due to authentication problems and account lockouts caused by WinSCP, we no longer recommend using this application for file transfer. We suggest the following instead.

FileZilla is a good cross-platform desktop file transfer application that is both free to use and open source. You can download the client from http://filezilla-project.org/ and install it on your own system.

When you launch FileZilla, the window looks like this: filezilla_main.png

First-time users will need to create a new connection which you can re-use later.

  1. Click on the the Site Manager button here:

    filezilla_sitemgr_button.png

  2. This opens up a new window. Click on the "New Site" button.

    filezilla_sitemgr1.png

  3. Set the name of your new site to something easy to remember, like the name of the server you are connecting to.

    filezilla_new_site.png

  4. Make the following changes to the site settings:
    • Protocol: SFTP - SSH File Transfer Protocol

    • Login Type: Ask for password

    • User: enter your username here, not your full email address

    And click OK when done.

    filezilla_sitemgr2.png

  5. You should now be returned to the main window. Click on the dropdown next to the Site Manager button and select your newly saved site.

    filezilla_host_selection.png

  6. You will be prompted for your password. Enter it here. NOTE: This is your CIS password, not your KSU eID password.

    filezilla_passwd_dialog.png

  7. Once connected, the main window should look like this. Transfer files by selecting the source on the left and destination on the right.

    filezilla_connected.png

  8. When you are finished, click on the Disconnect button.

    filezilla_disconnect.png

How do I burn an .ISO image to a Disc?

N022 and N126 labs have DeepBurner installed on the Windows machines along with CD/DVD burners. This is free software and is available to download for your own personal use at http://www.deepburner.com/.

To burn an .iso to CD/DVD, place a blank disc in the CD/DVD ROM tray and run DeepBurner. When the program starts, it will prompt you to select the project type. Select "Burn ISO image." Click the "..." button beside the Image file text box to specify the location of your saved .iso file. Click the "Burn ISO" button to begin burning the disc.




Linux Questions

NOTE: This document borrows heavily from the excellent documentation found in the Beocat wiki. Please have a look there for more details and in-depth examples.

How do I get started with Linux?

Getting Connected

To login remotely to CIS Linux systems, you first need an "SSH Client". SSH, short for "secure shell", is a protocol that allows secure communication between two computers. We recommend the following.

  • Windows
    • PuTTY is by far the most common SSH client, both for CIS and in the world.

    • MobaXterm is a fairly new client with some nice features, such as being able to SCP/SFTP (see below), and running X (Linux graphical desktop).

    • Cygwin is for those that would rather be running Linux but are stuck on Windows. It's purely a text interface.

  • Macintosh
    • OS-X has SSH a built-in application called "Terminal". It's not great, but it will work for most CIS users.
    • iTerm2 is the terminal application we prefer.

  • Others
    • There are many SSH clients for many different platforms available. While we don't have experience with many of these, any should be sufficient for access to CIS Linux systems.

You'll need to connect your client (via the SSH protocol, if your client allows multiple protocols) to cislinux.cis.ksu.edu.

For command-line tools, the command to connect is

Your username is your CIS login (usually the same as your eID) and the password is your CIS password (which is only the same as your eID password if you set it manually or using our password reset page).

Note: When you type your password, nothing shows up on the screen, not even asterisks.

The first time you log into a new host, you will be asked to confirm adding the SSL signature to your local repository. Just say "yes" in whatever appropriate form when asked.

You'll know you are successfully logged in when you see a prompt that says

username@hostname:~$

where hostname is the name of the machine you've logged into (currently either 'cougar' or 'viper') and username is your eID username

Transferring files (SCP or SFTP)

Usually, one of the first things people want to do is to transfer files into or out of their CIS account. To do so, you need to use SCP (secure copy) or SFTP (SSH FTP or Secure FTP). Again, there are multiple programs that do this.

  • Windows
    • Putty (see above) has PSCP and PSFTP programs (both are included if you run the installer). It is a command-line interface (CLI) rather than a graphical user interface (GUI).
    • MobaXterm (see above) has a built-in GUI SFTP client that automatically changes the directories as you change them in your SSH session.

    • FileZilla (client) has an easy-to-use GUI. Be sure to use 'SFTP' mode rather than 'FTP' mode.

    • WinSCP is another easy-to-use GUI.

    • Cygwin (see above) has CLI scp and sftp programs.
  • Macintosh
    • FileZilla is also available for OS-X.

    • Within terminal or iTerm, you can use the 'scp' or 'sftp' programs.
  • Linux
    • FileZilla also has a GUI linux version, in additon to the CLI tools.

Using a Command-Line Interface (CLI)

You can safely ignore this section if you're using a graphical interface (GUI).

Example: transfer a file called myfile.txt in your current folder to your home directory on CISLinux.

I am using my username (sgsax) here. You should replace this with your own when you run these commands.

Using SCP:

scp myfile.txt sgsax@cislinux.cis.ksu.edu:
Password: (type your password here, it will not show any response on the screen)
myfile.txt                                                                            100%    0     0.0KB/s   00:00

Note the colon at the end of the 'scp' line.

Using SFTP:

sftp sgsax@cislinux.cis.ksu.edu
Password: (type your password here, it will not show any response on the screen)
Connected to cislinux.cis.ksu.edu.
sftp> put myfile.txt
Uploading myfile.txt to /home/s/sgsax/myfile.txt
myfile.txt                                                                            100%    0     0.0KB/s   00:00
sftp> exit

SFTP is interactive, so this is a two-step process. First, you connect to CISLinux, then you transfer the file. As long as the system gives the <code>sftp> </code> prompt, you are in the sftp program, and you will remain there until you type 'exit'.

For more examples of advanced usage, please visit the Beocat wiki.

Linux Lingo

Here are a few basic terms we use when referring to "things" on a Linux system.

Term

Definition

Directory

A "Folder" in Windows or OS-X terms. A location where files or other directories are stored. The current directory is sometimes represented as . and the parent directory can be referenced as ..

Home Directory

Your personal storage area. This lives on the department's central file server and is accessible automatically whenever you login to any CIS Linux system. This is also the default directory you will start in when you login|

Shell

The interface or environment under which you can run commands. For most users, your shell is bash

SSH

Secure Shell. A protocol that encrypts data and can give access to another system, usually by a username and password

SCP

Secure Copy. Copying to or from a remote system using part of SSH

path

The list of directories which are searched when you type the name of a program. There is a section below on this

ownership

Every file and directory has an user and a group attached to it, called its owners. These affect permissions.

permissions

The ability to read, write, and/or execute a file. Permissions are based on ownership

switches

Modifiers or options to a command-line program, usually in the form of -(letter) or --(word).' Multiple single-letter switches may frequently be combined if needed for a command

pipes and redirects

Changes the input (often called 'stdin') and/or output (often called stdout) to a program or a file

Basic Linux Commands

Here are some of the most common commands you will be using:

Command

Function

ls

list files

cd

change directory

mkdir <dirname>

make a directory called <dirname>

rmdir <dirname>

remove or delete a directory called <dirname>

cat <filename>

print the contents of <filename> to the screen

cp <source> <destination>

copy from <source> to <destination>

mv <source> <destination>

move or renamce from <source> to <destination>

touch <filename>

create an empty file if it doesn't exists or update the last modified timestamp if it does

file <filename>

show some information about <filename>, such as what type of file it is

nano

edit files (probably the easiest text-based editor on our systems)

man

user manuals

If you need more details on how to use any of these, you can type man cmd where "cmd" is the name of the command you want more information about.

General CLI Notes

  • Linux interprets everything you type in a case-sensitve manner. This means upper- and lower-case letters matter, both in commands and filenames. e.g. "Documents" is not the same as "documents".

  • Your shell does not deal with spaces in filenames very nicely. I would strongly discourage you from doing so. If you must use spaces in your filenames, you will need to enclose them with double-quotes (") to interact with them on the command line. Other special characters you should stay away from in filenames include $, #, ;, \, ~, <, >, |, `, [, ], {, }, (, ), and &. These all have special meanings in bash (and other shells) and could result in unexpected (or damaging) behavior of your commands.

  • Tab-completion is your friend. No need to type that very long directory or filename, just hit the <Tab> key once you've typed enough unique letters and the shell will complete the name as it matches in the current directory. You can even do this multiple times for any filename or path as you type it.

  • Linux has no concept of "file extensions". Most GUI desktops will try to interpret them if you use typical ones (.pdf, .doc, .txt, etc), but there are no "rules" about what you name files. Use your own discretion. As with all things, consistent naming will keep you out of trouble later.

Some Practical Examples

Output is truncated in some of these. More can be found on the Beocat wiki.

Navigating and listing directories
  • What files and directories are in the directory I am currently in?
    testacct@viper:~$ ls
    Application Data  Favorites  My Music      Public         Videos
    Cookies           foo        My Pictures   Sent           workspace
    Desktop           Ghost.pif  Pictures      steamtest.vmf  xauth
    desktop.ini       Maildir    procmail-log  Templates
    Documents         Music      procmailrc    Trash
  • No, really, show me all the files.

    testacct@viper:~$ ls -a
    .                       .gnome2                       .nx
    ..                      .gnome2.old                   .openwin-menu
    .AbiSuite               .gnome2.old.old.old           .phoenix
    .acrobat                .gnome2_private               Pictures
    .adobe                  .gnome2_private.old           .pinerc
    Application Data        .gnome2_private.old.old.old   .pki
    .bash_history           .gnome.old.old.old            procmail-log
    .bash_profile           .gnupg                        procmailrc
    .bash_profile.bak       .gstreamer-0.10               .profile
    .bashrc                 .gstreamer-0.8                .profile.bak
    .bashrc.bak             .gtk-bookmarks                Public
    .cache                  .gtkrc-1.2-gnome2             .pulse
    <...>
    • -a is for "all files"

  • Can I have some more useful info about those files?
    testacct@viper:~$ ls -la
    total 380
    drwxr-xr-x  70 testacct testacct_users  4096 Oct  2 15:56 .
    drwxr-xr-x 199 root     root            8192 Aug 26 18:10 ..
    drwx------   2 testacct testacct_users    28 Aug 28  2008 .AbiSuite
    drwxr-x---   2 testacct testacct_users    18 Jul 23  2004 .acrobat
    drwx------   5 testacct testacct_users   115 Aug 28  2008 .adobe
    drwxrwx---   4 testacct testacct_users    39 Aug 21  2007 Application Data
    -rw-------   1 testacct testacct_users  6608 Aug 25 14:23 .bash_history
    -rw-r--r--   1 testacct testacct_users   533 Sep  3  2009 .bash_profile
    -rw-r-----   1 testacct testacct_users   279 Sep  3  2009 .bash_profile.bak
    -rw-r--r--   1 testacct testacct_users  1733 Sep  3  2009 .bashrc
    -rw-r-----   1 testacct testacct_users  2532 Sep  3  2009 .bashrc.bak
    drwx------  34 testacct testacct_users  4096 Aug 25 14:32 .cache
    drwxr-xr-x   7 testacct testacct_users    72 Aug  8  2004 .cfagent
    drwx------   3 testacct testacct_users    20 Aug 28  2012 .compiz
    drwxr-xr-x  22 testacct testacct_users  4096 Jul 24 16:40 .config
    drwx------   7 testacct testacct_users   155 Jan  8  2010 .config.bak
    drwxrwx---   2 testacct testacct_users    22 Aug 21  2007 Cookies
    <...>
    • -l is for "long listing"

    • -la is the equivalent of -l -a

  • Can I get that with human-readable file sizes in bytes?
    testacct@viper:~$ ls -lah
    total 380K
    drwxr-xr-x  70 testacct testacct_users 4.0K Oct  2 15:56 .
    drwxr-xr-x 199 root     root           8.0K Aug 26 18:10 ..
    drwx------   2 testacct testacct_users   28 Aug 28  2008 .AbiSuite
    drwxr-x---   2 testacct testacct_users   18 Jul 23  2004 .acrobat
    drwx------   5 testacct testacct_users  115 Aug 28  2008 .adobe
    drwxrwx---   4 testacct testacct_users   39 Aug 21  2007 Application Data
    -rw-------   1 testacct testacct_users 6.5K Aug 25 14:23 .bash_history
    -rw-r--r--   1 testacct testacct_users  533 Sep  3  2009 .bash_profile
    -rw-r-----   1 testacct testacct_users  279 Sep  3  2009 .bash_profile.bak
    -rw-r--r--   1 testacct testacct_users 1.7K Sep  3  2009 .bashrc
    -rw-r-----   1 testacct testacct_users 2.5K Sep  3  2009 .bashrc.bak
    drwx------  34 testacct testacct_users 4.0K Aug 25 14:32 .cache
    drwxr-xr-x   7 testacct testacct_users   72 Aug  8  2004 .cfagent
    drwx------   3 testacct testacct_users   20 Aug 28  2012 .compiz
    drwxr-xr-x  22 testacct testacct_users 4.0K Jul 24 16:40 .config
    drwx------   7 testacct testacct_users  155 Jan  8  2010 .config.bak
    drwxrwx---   2 testacct testacct_users   22 Aug 21  2007 Cookies
    <...>
  • Change directory to Documents

    testacct@viper:~$ cd Documents
    testacct@viper:~/Documents$
  • Change directory to foo that is in Documents

    testacct@viper:~$ cd Documents/foo
    testacct@viper:~/Documents/foo$
  • Change back to the parent directory of the one I am currently in
    testacct@viper:~/Documents/foo$ cd ..
    testacct@viper:~/Documents$
  • Change back to my home directory
    testacct@viper:~/Documents/foo$ cd
    testacct@viper:~$

    or

    testacct@viper:~/Documents/foo$ cd ~
    testacct@viper:~$

    or

    testacct@viper:~/Documents/foo$ cd $HOME
    testacct@viper:~$
  • Make a directory here called bar

    testacct@viper:~$ mkdir bar
  • Make a directory here called bar and contains another directory called baz

    testacct@viper:~$ mkdir -p bar/baz
    • -p is for "parents", or "create parent subdirectories as needed to get this full path created"

  • Remove an empty directory here called bar

    testacct@viper:~$ rmdir bar
  • Remove a directory here called bar and all of its contents, no matter how many sub-directories or files it contains (Potentially very dangerous as it will not ask you for confirmation).

    testacct@viper:~$ rmdir -rf bar
    • -r for "recursive" and -f for "force"

Working with files
  • Show me the contents of the file lorem_ipsum.txt

    testacct@viper:~$ cat lorem_ipsum.txt 
    Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Vivamus placerat, odio vel ultricies commodo, lectus mi ornare enim, in ornare risus lacus ac ipsum. Sed ac dui nec risus maximus porttitor. Quisque at lacinia sem, at blandit ex. Cras gravida felis in pretium tincidunt. Etiam nec hendrerit orci, eget scelerisque est. Pellentesque ultricies non neque interdum euismod. Quisque ac ante eu mauris eleifend commodo vitae id erat.
  • Create an empty file named empty.txt

    testacct@viper:~$ touch empty.txt
  • Copy the file foo.c to a new file called bar.c

    testacct@viper:~$ cp foo.c bar.c
  • Rename or move the file bar.c to baz.c

    testacct@viper:~$ mv bar.c baz.c
  • Delete or remove the file baz.c

    testacct@viper:~$ rm baz.c
  • What the heck kind of file is win-cis-64

    testacct@viper:~$ file win-cis-64
    win-cis-64: PNG image data, 64 x 64, 8-bit/color RGBA, non-interlaced

What are "Linux file permissions"?

All student and faculty files in the CIS department are stored on a Linux file server. However, not everyone needs or should have access to every file. Linux file permissions are how the file server decides who can access which files and what kind of access is permitted.

Ownership

Every file in Linux is assigned an user owner and a group owner. These form the basis of file security.

Each group may contain zero or more users. In the CIS department, every user has a special group which contains only their user (e.g., if your username were foobar, your group would be foobar_users).

You may not change the user ownership of your files. If you find that some of your files are owned by the wrong user, you will need to contact the systems staff to get that problem correct.

You may, however, change the group ownership of your files (or directories). You are only able to change a file's group ownership to another group to which you belong. You may change group ownership with the chgrp program:

chgrp foobar_users file.txt
chgrp foobar_users dir

File Mode

The second component of Linux file ownership is called "file mode." The file mode determines what access the user owner, group owner, or other user has to a file.

There are three kinds of access: read, write, and execute. The access granted by each of these depends upon whether they are applied to a directory or to a file. For files, read access gives the user permission to see the contents of the file, write access gives the user permission to change the contents of the file, and execute access gives the user permission to run the file as a program. For directories, read access gives the user permission to see what files are stored in that directory, write access gives the user permission to create files in that directory, and execute access allows the user to enter that directory (note that directory execute is required for read or write to mean anything).

Viewing File Permissions

To view the permissions on a file or directory you can use the -l option to the file list command, ls::

foobar@viper projects$ ls -l
total 4
drwx------   3 foobar foobar_users 4096 Mar 16 19:51 bin/
drwxrwxr-x   4 foobar foobar_users 4096 Mar 16 19:51 lib/
-rw-r--r--   1 foobar foobar_users  667 Mar 16 19:51 foo.txt
-rwxrwxr-x   1 foobar foobar_users  408 Mar 16 19:51 a.out

Here we see two directories and two files. The permissions are shown in the first column of the listing. The user owner is the third column and the group owner is the fourth column. The permissions are shown via the 10-character string. The first character (either d or - here) tells us what kind of thing is shown: d for directory and - for regular file (there are other kinds of "things" in a Linux file system, but those are beyond the scope of this discussion). The rest of the columns show the file mode.

The file mode is divided into three sections. The first applies to the user onwer, the second to the group owner, and the third to all other users. These fields are then divided into three letters, one for each permission granted: r for read, w for write, and x for execute.

The first row above shows a directory that is only accessible by user foobar. This user is allowed to change to the bin directory, see what files are in that directory, and allowed to put new files into that directory. The second row shows a publically accessible directory that is both user and group writable. Here anyone can change to and see the contents of the lib directory. However, only foobar and members of foobar_users are allowed to create files in that directory.

The third and forth rows show files. The first file is readable by everyone, but only writeable by foobar. The second file is readable and executable by everyone, but is only writable by foobar or members of foobar_users.

Changing File Mode

If you need to change the mode of a file or directory, you may do so with the chmod command. The chmod command takes two or more options. The first option is the permission changes you wish to make and the rest of the arguments are the files to change. (The actual command is a lot more flexible, but you may find out more about that by typing man chmod.)

The permission changes are specified in three parts: (1) whose permissions are being changed, (2) stating that permissions are being added or removed, and (3) what access is being granted or revoked.

The first, or "who", part of the options are specified with one or more letters: u for user, g for group, o for other, and a for all.

The second part is specified with either the plus (+) sign to grant permission or the minus (-) sign to revoke permission.

The third part is specified with the same letters as were used by ls when viewing permissions: r for read, w for write, and x for execute.

For example:

chmod a+rx script.pl
chmod og-w file.txt
chmod ug+rw source.c

The first line above would grant read and execute permission to all users on the file named script.pl. The second line would revoke write permissions on file.txt for other users and the group owner. The third would grant read and write permissions to the user owner and group owner on source.c.

Notice that this doesn't say anything about the existing permissions. For example, in the second line above, the user may not be allowed to write to the file either if the user was never granted that permission.

Absolute File mode

Advanced users may want to specify the mode quickly and exactly. This can be done by specifying the numeric file mode directly. The file mode may be specified as an octal number where the last three digits represent each of the three levels of access, user, group, and other, respectively. Each digit then specifies all three read, write, and execute for each of the three fields. Read is specified by the digit 4, write by 2, and execute by 1. Adding these together will get the overall permission.

For example:

chmod 755 script.pl
chmod 644 file.txt
chmod 660 source.c

After running these commands, we would see something like the following listing (note the first column especially):

foobar@viper src$ ls -l
total 3
-rwxr-xr-x   1 foobar foobar_users   432 Mar 10 12:40 script.pl
-rw-r--r--   1 foobar foobar_users  2590 Mar  8 17:22 file.txt
-rw-rw----   1 foobar foobar_users   596 Mar 12  7:04 source.c

Again see the man-page for chmod for details.

General Note About Directories

Linux requires that directories have the "execute" permission enabled. Without this permission, you will not be able to display the contents of a directory, even if you have "read" permissions enabled.

What about the /tmp directory?

Whenever working on a Linux system in the department, please be aware of the /tmp directory since it allows you to store files for a short time without affecting your quota. If you need to download a large file or work with some large files that you don't need to work with for long and can't fit into your home directory, you can place these files in /tmp, which is stored on the local disk of the current machine.

However, there are some things you should be aware of when using the the /tmp folder. First, filling up all space in the /tmp folder is a bad idea. You can cause certain programs on the system to freeze up if there is no room left on the drive, which may make working on that computer difficult. Second, the temporary folder is temporary and is cleaned out automatically once every hour. You should not rely on this directory for anything important.

I can't login to the Linux lab

Problem: When you try to login to a Linux lab desktop, the screen goes black and then reverts immediately to the login screen. No errors are displayed.

Cause: This is due to corruption or incompatibility of one of your X.org configuration files. The solution is to remove this file.

Resolution:

  1. Press <Ctrl>-<Alt>-<F1> to switch to a local virtual console and login using your regular credentials.

  2. At the prompt (ending with a $ character), type the following and press <Enter>

    • rm .Xauthority
  3. Logout using either logout or exit

  4. Switch back the the GUI login screen by pressing <Ctrl>-<Alt>-<F7>

You should now be able to login as usual.







Network Questions

What network storage is available to me?

All CIS users have storage on the department file server. The default quota is set at 2GB, but can usually be increased at any time if a request is sent to systems support staff (help@cis.ksu.edu). Anything you place in your home directory is backed up nightly, with revisions stored going back six months.

On department linux systems, your home directory is automatically mounted as $HOME. The full path to your home directory can be found if you use the finger command on yourself on any linux host.

$ finger testacct
Login: testacct                         Name: Testing Tester
Directory: /home/ugrads/testacct        Shell: /bin/bash
Never logged in.
No mail.
No Plan.

In this case, testacct's home directory is /home/ugrads/testacct.

On department Windows systems, your home directory should be mounted as the U: drive. If you are manually mounting a drive, use the URI \\homefiles.cis.ksu.edu\<username> where <username> is your login.

If you need a large amount of space temporarily, you can request space in the transient volume (send an email to help@cis.ksu.edu). There are no quotas on directories in this volume, but there are also no backups made of files here. Support staff may also ask you to clean files out periodically to make room for others. On department linux systems, your transient directory will be found in /transient/<username. On department Windows systems, you can mount the share \\homefiles.cis.ksu.edu\transient\<username> to a drive letter of your choosing.

How do I setup CGI on my web page?

This question has been answered in the CIS UserGuide. Please see the section on UserGuide/WebPages.

Why don't you have an FTP server?

FTP is a very old protocol. It was designed before security considerations were a major part of protocol design. As such, passwords to the FTP server are sent in plain text---any clever user on the network can snoop your packets and steal your password. This would allow that user to gain access to your account, which is an unacceptable violation of our security.

If you need to access your home directory from a remote location, there are two different methods for doing so. See the documentation in the CIS Systems UserGuide for Remote Access or in the FrequentlyAskedQuestions about how to access your home directory from a non-CIS computer.

How do I backup data to CIS?

To setup an automated backup from a linux or OS X laptop to CIS filesystems follow these steps:

First, make sure that you have a $HOME/bin directory on your laptop.

mkdir -p $HOME/bin
chmod u+rwx $HOME/bin

Next, copy this script to $HOME/bin/backup_to_cis.sh on your laptop. You will need to change the DIRECTORIES variable to whichever directories from your home directory on your laptop that need backed up.::

   1 #!/usr/bin/env bash
   2   
   3 ###
   4 # Script to backup laptop home directory files to CIS home directory
   5 ###
   6  
   7 # These are the directories that will be backed up from your homedir.
   8 # For example: If I have ~/docs and ~/proposals that I want backed up,
   9 #              I would change the next line to:
  10 #              DIRECTORIES="docs proposals"
  11 DIRECTORIES="dir1 dir2"
  12   
  13 test_exists () {
  14     which $1 > /dev/null 2>&1
  15     return $?
  16 }
  17   
  18 die () {
  19     echo $1
  20     exit 1
  21 }
  22   
  23 CIS_BACKUP_DIR="~/laptop_backups"
  24 CIS_SERVER="linux.cis.ksu.edu"
  25 RSYNC_OPTS="--archive --delete --rsh=ssh --quiet"
  26 UTILITIES="ssh rsync"
  27   
  28 # Ensure that ssh and rsync exist
  29 for UTILITY in ${UTILITIES}; do
  30     test_exists ${UTILITY} || die "Couldn't find ${UTILITY}"
  31 done
  32   
  33 # Ensure that each directory exists locally; then copy it to CIS
  34 for DIR in ${DIRECTORIES}; do
  35     if [ ! -d ${HOME}/${DIR} ]; then
  36         echo "Could not find ${HOME}/${DIR} -- skipping"
  37     else
  38         rsync ${RSYNC_OPTS} ${HOME}/${DIR} ${CIS_SERVER}:${CIS_BACKUP_DIR}/
  39     fi
  40 done

Next, make sure your script is executable.::

chmod u+rwx $HOME/bin/backup_to_cis.sh

Next, setup ssh keys as outlined in this FAQ.

Next, setup a cronjob to run this script. Run crontab -e as your user and add the following line if you want to backup at midnight every day. Run man 5 crontab if you want a different time and do not know the crontab format.

0 0 * * * ${HOME}/bin/backup_to_cis.sh

Obviously, your laptop will need to be turned on with a network connection for a backup to take place. You can always run the backup script manually by executing this command.

$HOME/bin/backup_to_cis.sh

To setup an automated backup from a Windows laptop to CIS filesystems follow these steps:

First, you'll need to create a directory in your homedir to save backups. On a Windows lab machine, this is your U:. If you are doing this remotely, you can connect to our network remotely by following this document.

Map your remote homedir to your local computer by going up one directory, right Finally, customize whatever additional options you'd like for your backup click on your username and choose Map Network Drive.

After you've created your backup folder in your homedir, you will now need to download and install Cobian Backup.

Follow the on-screen instructions for installing Cobian Backup on your personal workstation.

After Cobian Backup is installed, a moon image should appear in your system tray (on the bottom right of your screen), or you may simply launch it by going to your `Start Menu > All Programs > Cobian Backup > Cobian Backup Interface`.

Click on the Tasks pane on your left to active that tab. Right click inside it's window and choose Add Task. Name your task in the Task Name field and modify other settings in that tab as needed. Click on the Files tab on the top of that window to add the files you'd like backed up on the CIS Systems. In the destination section under the Files tab click on the open folder (Add A Directory) and choose the folder inside the mapped network drive you just created.

Next you can schedule your backups via the Schedule tab (Daily, Weekly, Monthly, etc.).

Finally, customize whatever additional options you'd like for your backup if you deem them necessary. Click OK.

Your backups will now run according to the schedule you indicated on the Schedule tab automatically (providing your computer is turned on during that time period).

How do I forward my CIS email somewhere else?

This question has been answered in the CIS UserGuide. Please see the section on UserGuide/Email.

How do I use HTTP authentication?

To setup password authentication for a directory in your personal web space follow these steps from a linux shell (you will want to change passwordProtectedDir to whatever name you want and use your own usernames). <your_home_dir_path> is the full path to your home directory. If you don't know what this is, use the finger command from the command prompt of any linux host ("finger <eid>", where <eid> is your eID).

   1 cd ~/public_html/
   2 mkdir passwordProtectedDir
   3 cd passwordProtectedDir
   4 htpasswd -c .htpasswd user_who_gets_access
   5 htpasswd .htpasswd other_user
   6 cat << EOF > ~/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/.htaccess
   7 AuthType Basic
   8 AuthName "Checking Password"
   9 AuthUserFile <your_home_dir_path>/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/.htpasswd
  10 Require valid-user
  11 EOF

Now create any files you want in the directory and set permissions appropriately.

chmod o+rx ~/public_html/passwordProtectedDir
chmod o+r ~/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/*.*

If you would like your files to only be password protected off-campus, use this command to make your htaccess file.

cat << EOF > ~/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/.htaccess
AuthType Basic
AuthName "Checking Password"
AuthUserFile <your_home_dir_path>/public_html/passwordProtectedDir/.htpasswd
Require valid-user
Order Allow,Deny
# This restricts access without a password to the KSU network
Allow from 129.130.0.0/16
# This restricts access without a password to the CIS network
#Allow from 129.130.8.0/22
Satisfy any
EOF

Why am I getting 500 Interal Server Error on all my scripts?

We use programs named suexec and suphp to make sure that all of your scripts run as you. This allows your scripts to access files that would normally be private and inaccessible by the web server. However, for security these programs will not allow your scripts to run unless the permissions set on your files and on the directories containing them are safe.

For CGI scripts, you must make sure the following are true:

1. Your script must be stored in your home directory in the subdirectory named public_html/cgi-bin. You cannot place your scripts anywhere else.

2. You must make sure that your home directory, the public_html directory, and the cgi-bin directory are not group or other writable:

  • chmod 755 ~
    chmod 755 ~/public_html
    chmod 755 ~/public_html/cgi-bin

3. Finally, you must make sure your scripts are executable, but not group or other writable:

  • chmod 755 ~/public_html/cgi-bin/my-script.cgi

4. If you have problems, try checking the end of the logs for additional information while pressing reload on your browser:

  • tail -f /web/logs/error_log /web/logs/suexec_log

For PHP scripts, you must make sure the following are true:

1. Your script must be stored in your home directory under the directory named public_html or a subdirectory of that directory.

2. You must make sure that your home directory, the public_html directory, and every directory above your PHP script is accessible but not group or other writable:

  • chmod 755 ~
    chmod 755 ~/public_html
    chmod 755 ~/public_html/otherdir

3. Finally, you must make sure your scripts are readable, but not group or other writable:

  • chmod 644 ~/public_html/index.php
    chmod 644 ~/public_html/otherdir/index.php

4. If you have problems, try checking the end of the logs for additional information while pressing reload on your browser:

  • tail -f /web/logs/error_log /web/logs/suphp_log

How do I setup ssh keys?

To setup ssh keys for authentication between CIS Linux and Solaris hosts, follow these steps

chmod go-w ~
cd ~/.ssh/
chmod 700 .
ssh-keygen -t dsa
cat id_dsa.pub >> authorized_keys2
chmod 600 *

How do I access the wireless network in Nichols?

The CIS Wireless network is now managed by the K-State Computing and Network Services (CNS) department. To gain access to the network, you will need to have a valid eID and follow these instructions listed on the CNS website.

How do I access the wired network in Nichols?

The CIS wired network only allows registered hosts to connect. If you wish to use your own system on the CIS network, please send an email to help@cis.ksu.edu with the MAC (hardware) address of your network card and your hostname. Most requests are handled within the hour if submitted during business hours (8AM-5PM, Monday-Friday). Once you have received notice that your registration request has been approved, please reboot or restart your network connection.

How do I access the campus VPN?

Please see the K-State page on how to download, install, and use the VPN client for off-campus connection.

http://www.k-state.edu/infotech/networks/vpn/

How do I login remotely to CIS resources?

As of August, 2012, ITS Security team is blocking remote access to desktop computers from off-campus. Only certain systems will be available from off-campus.

Windows (Remote Desktop):

  • remote.cis.ksu.edu (uses your CIS login)
  • remote-ksu.cis.ksu.edu (uses your KSU eID login)

Linux (SSH):

  • cislinux.cis.ksu.edu

There are no publicly-accessible Mac hosts in our department, only systems that are owned or used by individuals or projects.

Wireless users please note: For SSH or RDP access to our remote access servers, you may not be connected to the "KSU Guest" wireless network. This network only allows web traffic (http/https) and nothing else. You must be connected to "KSU Wireless" or "KSU Housing" if you are on-campus.

If you need access to any other CIS system and don't want to go through one of the above hosts first, you may install the campus VPN client on your remote systems (home desktops, laptops, etc), which you can download here: http://www.ksu.edu/its/security/vpn/. When you run it, you should login with your KSU eID and connect using the "Full Tunnel" option. This routes all your desktop network traffic through the KSU network, effectively putting your desktop behind the campus firewall. You can now use Remote Desktop or SSH client to connect to any CIS system.




Miscellaneous Questions

How do I connect to Oracle?

Before you can access your Oracle database schema, you must contact the system administrators to request an account.

Once the administrators have notified you that your account has been created, you may connect using the following instructions.

Connecting from Microsoft Windows

You can contact the Oracle server from any Windows lab machine by logging in as yourself (using your CIS username and password) on the machine. Then go to:

Start > All Programs > Oracle - OraHome90 > Application Development > SQL Plus

Now, logon to Oracle using your Oracle username and password. In the Host String: field you should enter oracle.

Connecting from Linux

You can connect to the Oracle server from any machine in the department using the sqlplus client as follows:

sqlplus username@oracle

where you put your username in place of username and then enter your Oracle password.

Connecting from Java

First, you will need to locate the JAR file for the version of Java that you will use to connect to the server. The drivers are available for download from the CIS Oracle web server.

The file you need will depend upon the version of Java you will be using:

classes111: Java 1.1
classes12:  Java 1.2, 1.3
ojdbc14:    Java 1.4, 1.5

The names of the files will have a trailing .zip or .jar. It makes no difference which you choose. Unless you know you need them, you can ignore the files labeled _g or named somethign else.

Once you've added that appropriate Java JAR file to your CLASSPATH, you will need to include this code snippet in your program:

   1 Class.forName("oracle.jdbc.driver.OracleDriver");
   2 Connection conn = DriverManager.getConnection(
   3     "jdbc:oracle:thin:@oracle.cis.ksu.edu:1521:ORACLE", 
   4     "username", "password");

where you will replace username and password with your Oracle username and password.

Connecting from the web

You can find the iSQL*Plus web gateway at http://oracle.cis.ksu.edu/isqlplus. You will be redirected to a secure connection from URL.

General Connection Information

If you are connecting from another language or need more advanced support, you may find the following information helpful:

Oracle Host: oracle.cis.ksu.edu
Oracle Port: 1521
Oracle Home: /oracle/home/product/9.2.0.1.0
Oracle SID:  ORACLE
Oracle UID:  oracle.cis.ksu.edu

We also keep a local copy of the Oracle server documentation on the Oracle web server for your convenience.

If you have any other questions or problems, please send a request to the system administrators.

How do I change my Oracle password?

Connect to the Oracle server using sqlplus on the commandline, or via the iSQL*Plus web interface.

Once there, issue the following SQL statement:

alter user user_name identified by new_password;

Where user_name is your user name and new_password is the password you wish to use.

Oracle passwords must meet all of the following restrictions:

  1. Passwords can be from 1 to 30 characters.
  2. The first character in an Oracle password must be a letter.
  3. Only letters, numbers, and the symbols “#”, “_” and “$” are acceptable in a password.

How do I connect to MySQL?

Before you can access your MySQL database, you must request an account by sending an email to help@cis.ksu.edu.

Once your account has been created, you may connect using the instructions below.

You can connect to the MySQL server from any host on the campus network. You will not be able to connect to it from off-campus unless you use the KSU VPN client, which you can download here. Campus wifi users: you will not be able to connect if you are on the "KSU Guest" wifi network. If you are on wifi, you must be using the "KSU Wireless" network.

Connecting from Linux

To connect from Linux, you must first logon to one of the lab machines (or you may connect from your own laptop). Once logged in, you can connect to the MySQL server by typing:

mysql -p -h mysql.cis.ksu.edu

and then enter your MySQL password when prompted.

Using phpMyAdmin

To administer your database through a web interface, you can use phpMyAdmin from any Internet-connected computer.

How do I change my MySQL password?

There are a couple of ways to change your password:

  • Connect using the command above. Once connected, type the following at the prompt
     set password = password("yournewpassword");

    Where yournewpassword is your new password.

How do I reset my MySQL password?

Send an email to support@cis.ksu.edu or stop by the sysadmin offices (N116, N117) during regular business hours.

General Connection Information

You may find the following information helpful:

MySQL Host: mysql.cis.ksu.edu
MySQL Port: 3306

A copy of the MySQL 5.0 documentation can be find at the MySQL homepage.

If you have any other questions or problems, please send a request to the system administrators.

What happens when I leave? How long do I keep my account?

Please see the "Alumni Accounts and Account Removal" section of UserGuide/Accounts.

Can you guys help me with my homework?

We want to make our policy on helping students clear. The CIS support staff is responsible for making sure the computing systems, networks, services, and programs on those systems function. We will help anyone who has a problem using these systems.

However, we draw the line at looking at any source code or server or program configurations students themselves have installed. This is due to the fact that CIS faculty are frequently asking students to configure and manipulate software on their own as part of homework assignments. As such the CIS support staff explicitly do not examine source code or other issues for students.

If you are convinced that this problem is indeed an issue related to a CIS systems bug or misconfiguration, you may contact your professor and ask for assistance. At the specific request of faculty members we will look into source code or other issues, but only in order to determine the location of the problem.

As an additional clarification, this policy doesn't preclude us from answering questions and giving advice to students. The systems coordinator and students may volunteer to render help or give advice at their discretion. Please be sure your requests for advice are keeping with your professors' honor code requirements for the applicable course.

What do I do when the printer is out of paper?

If one of the printers runs out of paper, you just need to contact the system administrators. We get paper and load the printers on request.

Alternately, if no one is available at those locations you may either email support or talk to one of the staff members in the main CIS office, Nichols 234.

How do I use VMWare in the Computing Labs

Please read our guide for full details on using a VM image for classwork.

How do I install JPF (Java PathFinder)?

Initial Steps

The JPF install script may be run from cislinux.cis.ksu.edu or any CIS Linux lab machine. Windows users must ssh into cislinux using Putty or another ssh client.

Once you have completed the installation from any Linux machine, it will work on any other CIS Linux machine.

  1. Log into cislinux.cis.ksu.edu (or any CIS Linux lab machine). All following command should be run in a terminal session or terminal window.
  2. Make sure the Sun JDK is in your system path. You should see something like this:
    $ set | grep JAVA_HOME
    JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/default-java
    $ set | grep PATH
    PATH=/usr/bin:/usr/local/bin:/usr/bin:/bin:/usr/games:/usr/lib/jvm/default-java

    JAVA_HOME could also be something like /usr/lib/jvm/java-6-sun. If JAVA_HOME is not set and not also in PATH, you will need to add the following to your ~/.profile:

    export JAVA_HOME=/usr/lib/jvm/default-java
    export PATH=$PATH:$JAVA_HOME
    Logout and back in to load the new configuration, or just reload it for your current session
    $ source ~/.profile
  3. Now you can run the install script which will place the JPF files in your home directory and build them:
    $ /common/public/bin/install_jpf.sh

    You will now have a built copy of JPF in ~/JPF2.

Running JPF

Create the following shell scripts to help you build and run JPF test classes:

compile.sh

JPF=$HOME/JPF2/
CLASSPATH=.:$JPF/jpf-core/build/jpf/
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/lib/*
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/src/main/
javac -cp $CLASSPATH $1

run.sh

JPF=$HOME/JPF2/
CLASSPATH=.:$JPF/jpf-core/build/*
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/lib/*
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/build/classes/
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/bin/
CLASSPATH=$CLASSPATH:$JPF/jpf-core/src/main/

ARGS="+vm.por.sync_detection=false"
ARGS=$ARGS" +jpf.report.console.property_violation=trace,error,snapshot"
ARGS=$ARGS" +jpf.listener=.tools.DeadlockAnalyzer"
ARGS=$ARGS" +deadlock.format=essential"

java -Xmx512m -jar $JPF/jpf-core/build/RunJPF.jar +classpath=$CLASSPATH  $ARGS $1

Place them somewhere in your homedir (in your JPF2 directory is probably a good place) and make them executable

$ chmod +x compile.sh
$ chmod +x run.sh

See your instructor for how to use these scripts.

For More Information

Please see the Java PathFinder site:

http://javapathfinder.sourceforge.net/

How do I use PC^2 for the ACM Programming Contest?

PC2 is used for submitting solutions and scoring for the ACM Programming Contest. You may either use a local fat client (pc2team) or the web client (EWTeam).

Web Client: EWTeam

Point a web browser to http://pc2.cis.ksu.edu and login with the credentials provided by the contest coordinator. This should work for all browsers and all operating systems. You can also look at the current scoreboard from this app.

Local Client: pc2team

To use the local client, you must install it in at least one team member's home directory.

Previously Installed Copy

If you used PC2 for previous contests, you must remove the old directory before installing the current one. Look for a "pc2" directory on your U: drive or in your home directory and delete it before continuing.

Installation

  1. Login to a Linux lab machine, or open an SSH session using PuTTY or another SSH client to cislinux.cis.ksu.edu
  2. Run the install script
    • $ /common/public/bin/install_pc2.sh

Running

  • In Windows
    1. Open a Command Prompt window (click Start->Programs->Accessories->Command Prompt, or Start->Run and type cmd)

    2. Change to your home files (U: drive) and enter the pc2 directory
      • > U:
        > cd pc2
    3. Start the PC2 client
      • U:\pc2>bin\pc2team
      • You cannot run pc2team by double-clicking on it in Windows Explorer, you must start it from the command prompt as described here.
  • In Linux
    1. Open a terminal window
    2. Enter the pc2 directory in your home directory
      • $ cd $HOME/pc2
    3. Start the PC^2 client
      • $ bin/pc2team
  • Login using the credentials provided to you by the judges.
  • Note 1: you must run the pc2team application as described here, do not cd bin first and then run pc2team, otherwise the client will not be able to read its configuration file and you will not be able to connect to the server.

  • Note 2: if you wish to view the current scoreboard, you may run the application pc2board instead of pc2team in the last step listed above.

Usage

Full documentation of the pc2team client can be found in the pc2 install directory in your home directory. Look in the doc directory for the file PC2V9TeamGuide.pdf.

How do I use the Adobe Acrobat Connect Server?

In-Depth How-To

How to use the Adobe Connect service

Creating Accounts

Only some department users (primarily faculty) are permitted to have accounts which can be used to create and administer meetings.

I need some software by VMWare for a project, can you give it to me?

Possibly. Our licensing with VMWare, via the VMware Academic Program, allows us to give students software and licenses to install software on their own computers, for a period of 12 months at a time. Software may be obtained from the VMWare webstore. At the beginning of each semester, we update the online database with a list of all students currently enrolled in a CIS class. When we do this, you will receive an email from "Kansas State University, Manhattan - Computing and Info. Sciences" which contains a link that you will need to click to activate your account and set a password for it. Zimbra mail will sometimes flag this as spam, so if you don't see it in your Inbox, please check in your Spam/Junk folders to see if it is filtered there.

If your account is currently active or previously added but you never activated it, you will not receive an email. If you previously had an account that had been deactivated (accounts are deactivated automatically after one year from their creation), you will receive an email saying your account has been reactivated. If you don't remember your password in either of these cases, click on the "Forgot you password?" link on the site login page. Your username will always be <your_eid>@ksu.edu.

Once your account is confirmed, you can login to the webstore any time at the following URL:

http://e5.onthehub.com/WebStore/ProductsByMajorVersionList.aspx?ws=5e4dba18-d630-de11-a497-0030485a8df0&vsro=8

You are free to download any software available on this site. Software available for students from the VMware Academic Program includes desktop applications, such as Fusion (for Mac OS), Workstation (for Linux and Windows), and Player (for all platforms). You can also get a discount code for enrollment in the VMWare Certified Professional program. Software for faculty includes all of these plus vSphere and vCenter products, as well as ESXi and ESX.

Remember, this is for you own personal use as a CIS student. You are not legally permitted to download software for your friends or families. Doing so will break the terms of the agreement. Distributing illegal copies of software is against state and federal laws and the policies of this university.

How do I install IBM Rational Software Architect?

The installation files can be found in the public file share. In Windows, this is \\files.cis.ksu.edu\pub and in Linux, this is /pub. Once you have opened this share, change to the software\IBM\Rational directory. Select the directory for edition you want to install (most users will want the standard edition in the RSA_8.5 directory, but the others are available if you need them. Use the following directions to complete the installation. Both steps must be completed.

Note: This is for installing on Windows, but Linux installation is similar.

Step 1: Suite Installation

  1. Open the Setup\install_windows folder and run install.exe

  2. Click on "Install Rational Software Architect"
  3. Make sure all boxes are checked on the initial "Install Packages" screen and click Next, and then Next again

  4. Accept the license terms and click Next

  5. Change install directories if desired (defaults should be fine) and click Next

  6. Change install directory for "Software Delivery Platform" and/or architecture if desired and click Next

  7. It is usually best to let it install the bundled Eclipse environment, but you can choose an existing one if you wish and click Next to continue

  8. Select additional features if desired and click Next

  9. Select how you want help files delivered and click Next

  10. Click Install to start installing files (this will take a while)

  11. Click Finish when done

Step 2: License Installation

  1. Select the "IBM Installation Manager" from the Start menu
  2. Click on Manage Licenses

  3. Select "IBM Rational Software Architect" from the list, click "Import product Activation Kit", and then Next to continue

  4. Browse to the folder you installed from and into the Activation_Kit folder there and open the .jar file in that folder, click Next to continue

  5. Accept the license terms and click Finish to install the license

  6. Click Finish when done and close the Installation Manager

When I run Visual Paradigm UML, I am asked to select a license

Installing the license locally

If you are running Visual Paradigm UML on a CIS Windows lab machine, you need the license file installed for your user profile. You can do this by clicking on Start>All Programs>Visual Paradigm>Install Visual Paradigm License. You will be shown a security warning about running an program on the network, click "Run" to approve. Press any key when prompted to close the Command Prompt window. Restart Visual Paradigm and it should run normally.

If you are running Visual Paradigm UML on your own Windows machine, you will need to download the license file here, and copy it to the following location: %USERPROFILE%\visualparadigm\.vplls. Create this folder if it doesn't exist (in a command prompt):

C:\> mkdir %USERPROFILE%\visualparadigm\.vplls

Workaround for Campus Firewall Blocking

If you are running VP-UML on your own system and trying to use it on campus, you need to update the JRE included with the application. You will first need to download a new JRE from http://www.java.com and extract it to your local harddrive. Then follow these steps to place it in the correct folder for VP-UML to use it in Windows.

  1. Close Visual Paradigm if running
  2. Rename jre folder in C:\Program Files\Visual Paradigm for UML 10.0 to jre.bak

  3. Copy jre1.7.0_17 folder from where you extracted it to C:\Program Files\Visual Paradigm for UML 10.0

  4. Rename jre1.7.0_17 folder in C:\Program Files\Visual Paradigm for UML 10.0 to jre

  5. Start Visual Paradigm; you should see dialog that says "Academic license Key is received"
  6. Close Visual Paradigm and run VP-UML Update from the Start menu under Visual Paradigm

  7. Confirm no VP apps are running and click "OK" on the dialog box
  8. Make sure "Visual Paradigm update server" is selected and click "Check Update"
  9. Only apply updates to 10.0, do not upgrade to 10.1 if offered
  10. Close when done